Me · You

The 50/50 Rule and Why I Blog

My blog’s current tag line is “This is not a blog.”

Originally, this site was intended as a way to keep track of links to interesting or useful things, like glorified bookmarks. But since then, it has evolved to serve another purpose: to make me think and communicate about stuff.

See, as I was bookmarking stuff, I found myself adding little bits about why I liked the link or context about how I found it. Over time, I found that when I would link to an article, I would sometimes want to add a summary about the article to help me process it and remember it better.

A better way to learn, process, retain and remember information is to learn half the time, and share half the time.

If I take two seconds to effortlessly save a bookmark, then the information is saved and soon forgotten. If I add even a quick post about it, giving it a title and some context or a summary, then that post is now a part of me. And as a bonus, I get to share it with other people.

So I was happy to see this article, which makes me think I am not wasting my time.

πŸ‘‰ The 50/50 Rule (How to Retain And Remember 90% of Everything You Learn)

It basically says that if you make yourself talk about something, then you come to understand it or appreciate it better. Spend half you time learning and half your time explaining what you learned.

According to the article, I would be serving myself better by writing out my notes by hand. It seems people type too fast for their brain to absorb what they’re doing. And simply by writing that, I now remember that fact. But I’m typing this anyways because you can’t tag, search, and share your paper notebook. πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ

And yes, this article is so meta.

4 thoughts on “The 50/50 Rule and Why I Blog

      1. πŸ˜‡ It’s still really for me. I notice I send emails to friends, like science stuff always goes to my friend Andy, etc. It’s even better than a blog and certainly better than bookmarks. Well, bookmarks are probably fine for a lot of people; I think they’re boring and ultimately for me they’re not that helpful.

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  1. It’s key to have a science friend. πŸ˜‰

    In my experience, bookmarks are like a giant filing cabinet that you can dump stuff into to feel better, but you never go back and use the bookmarks because there are too many and they’re too hard to organize. These days, I limit my bookmarks to only what fits on my Safari favorites bar. Anything else goes into this blog, Notes, or trash.

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