The World

Apollo 11 Source Code 🚀

In the coolest news ever, the source code for the freakin’ Apollo 11 space modules was recently revealed on GitHub. 🤩

Specifically, this is the source code for the guidance systems of the Lunar module (the thingy that landed on the surface of the moon) and the Command Module (the can that orbited the moon during the mission).

👉 Apollo-11 on GitHub

A few cool points:

  • The code submission date is March 28, 1969.
  • The programmer is one Margaret H. Hamilton, Colossus Programming Leader Apollo Guidance and Navigation. If anyone is still saying “girls” can’t code, then you can seriously stop now.
  • There are two literal modules in the project: Comanche055 (Colossus 2A, the Command Module), Luminary099 (Luminary 1A, the Lunar Module). So much for thinking of “modules” as just a programming concept. These were two physical components literally flying around the moon.
  • These nerds were funny too. The master ignition routine is called BURN_BABY_BURN. 😂
  • The code seems to be written in some sort of assembler language, as in 1969 basically no modern languages were yet invented.
  • The code comments are currently being translated to other spoken languages as part of this open source project. For all mankind, mothers! 🌎
Software Dev

Easy Xcode Quoting

This is one of those shortcuts in Xcode that saves a tiny amount of time but feels amazing. Via iOS Dev Weekly.

Austin · Texas

McKinney Falls

That shalt not forget McKinney Falls as a great day hike around Austin.

Software Dev

Swift API Design Guidelines

Here are some really sensible and helpful guidelines for writing an API in Swift. This is from the Swift team itself, so they’re pretty much the experts on what works.

👉 Swift API Design Guidelines

The focus is on clarity. Guidelines include “Clarity is more important than brevity”, “Include all the words needed to avoid ambiguity”, “Omit needless words”, “Stick to the established meaning”. Most of these could practically apply to real life. 🤷🏻‍♂️

But this one just sounds cool: “Take extra care with unconstrained polymorphism.” 🤯 (Always a solid idea.)

Image result for swift

Note: much of this should be seen in practice in the Swift Standard Library.

You

Discomfort is Your Best Friend

I really love the message in this article. It sounds severe, but discomfort is actually your best friend in life.

👉 You Will Not Grow Until You Learn to Tolerate Discomfort

I have found this to be more and more true the older I get, to the point where if things are very easy or comfortable for too long, it sort of terrifies me. It is the first sign of your downfall. 🤷🏻‍♂️

Embracing discomfort and seeing it as your friend allows you to shed fear and enjoy the feeling of progress. It lets you learn to play guitar or programming, it lets you take a chance with someone, it lets you find new ways to be happy and fit, it lets you be shed stale thinking.

When we are in pain, discomfort heightens and communicates. When we are making progress, discomfort peaks and recedes, and clarity washes over us.

PS I told my kid the other day that discomfort grows you, before I even read this article. She said that sounded like something I would read. 😂

Software Dev

Control Room

Yes, we’re developers, and sometimes we prefer the command line. But simctl is a party cryptic way to control the iOS simulator on your Mac. This guy Paul Hudson has put together a nice Mac UI to tame the simulator.

👉 Control Room on GitHub

Thank you, Paul. 🤟 (And where do these people even find the time? 🤷🏻‍♂️). I love his can-do developer attitude, btw:

simctl is a great tool for controlling the iOS simulator, but I find it a little hard to use. So, I wrote Control Room.

Via iOS Dev Weekly.