Software Dev

Scroll Hitch Rate

Xcode 12 is adding a new metric to objectively track how smoothly your app scrolls. This is kind of cool since scrolling smoothness feels right and is a sign of a good design.

Via iOS Dev Weekly.

Austin

10 Weird and Wonderful Places to Stay in Texas

Are you tired of sitting around the house during this pandemic? Do you want to get out somewhere fun and interesting but keep socially distanced?

If you’re in Texas and not ready to hop on an airplane or crowd into some cosmopolitan hotel, then this guide is for you.

👉 10 Weird & Wonderful Places to Stay in Texas

Would you like to spend your weekend in a treehouse high up in the cypress trees with a canopy tour to boot? Or perhaps in a teepee? Maybe being surrounded by gazelles, zebras, yak and emu sounds fun. Or maybe glamping in an Airstream at the beach is your cup of tea. Sleeping in a caboose is a choice. There’s also an old Spanish mission.

Okay, this all sounds like a Dr. Seuss book. I’m tempted to go back and make it rhyme. Maybe another time.

Software Dev

Learn to Love Throwing in Swift

I really like the points made in this article about Swift error handling: using throw/try/catch is actually much better than returning optionals or the new Result type.

👉Benefits of using throwing functions (try) – Swift’s most underrated feature?

Throwing errors, when used throughout your codebase, helps you reduce and simplify code. It makes your unit testing easier too.

As a former Java programmer, I have to admit some hesitance to throw anything. Java error handling can turn into a nightmare of its own.

But the author makes some compelling arguments why throwing might make sense in Swift. Error handling is never fun; let’s do it the easy way. 🤷🏻‍♂️

In a related note, Re: Making Wrong Code Look Wrong also talks about the benefits of throwing in Swift, in particular with relation to local reasoning. 👍

Via iOS Dev Weekly.

History

The Tulsa Massacre of 1921

Quartz published the story of the Tulsa massacre of 1921, in which the burgeoning “Black Wall Street” neighborhood of Tulsa was set ablaze in a bizarre night of white racial rage. Hundreds or African Americans were killed, and many thousands lost their homes.

👉 We still don’t know just how much was lost in the Tulsa massacre of 1921

More than a thousand African American homes and businesses were looted and burned to the ground; you had a thriving community occupying more than 35 square blocks in Tulsa that was totally destroyed.

But the real story is how little we know about this, “the single largest incident of racial violence in American history.” This terrible story was purposefully forgotten, apparently out of shame.

Despite the gravity of the event, like other important chapters of African-American history, the Tulsa race massacre was all but deleted from the US’s collective memory for decades.

It is also interesting that this savage attack did not destroy the neighborhood, which came bouncing back stronger than ever after the violence. However, eventually the larger forces of “desegregation, urban redesign, and competition from large-scale white businesses” did it in. 🤦🏻‍♂️

Via Apple News.