The World

Immunity ๐Ÿฆ : It’s in Your Bones ๐Ÿฆด

There has been some confusion around the topic of how long Coronavirus immunity lasts, so it’s nice to see some new info about it. This is not the first time we’ve seen evidence that Coronavirus immunity is long-lasting, well beyond the life of your active antibodies.

Yes, antibodies fight an active infection. But your immunity does not end there. Memory of the virus lives in your bone marrow ๐Ÿคฏ as “memory B cells”. You can literally feel it in your bones. ๐Ÿ˜‰

These B cells retain intel on the virus you had previously fought off so your body can produce fresh antibodies quickly on re-exposure. B cells last for years, if not your entire life. And theyโ€™re flexible and can deal with variants as well.

So if you’ve been vaccinated or had the virus and recovered, enjoy your amazing immune system and go forth and conquer!

Travel

The Cerne Abbas Giant

Next time in England, it would be fun to visit some of the ancient geoglyphs etched into chalk in the hills there.

The Cerne Abbas Giant, for one, is 180 feet tall and has a 26-foot-long, uh, thing. People visit it for fertility. ๐Ÿค”

๐Ÿ‘‰ The Mysterious Origins of the Cerne Abbas Giant (The New Yorker)

And there are plenty of others with odd stories. Always a good excuse to get out to some otherwise random English countryside.

You

How To Talk To People You Disagree With

Lots of people are still hesitant to get the Corona vaccine. Maybe you’re one of them. Or maybe they’re driving you crazy.

If you want to know how to talk to people about this — or really about any subject on which you disagree with someone — then there are some good tips in this example text message conversation.

Hint: It turns out that it’s not helpful to lecture people, judge them, or overload them with information. Who knew? ๐Ÿคท๐Ÿปโ€โ™‚๏ธ๐Ÿ˜‰

creativity

The Opposite of a Story

We humans are made for stories. We love to hear stories. Stories make ideas more relatable and memorable.

I have been learning about the art of storytelling, both written and verbal. Basically it comes down to this:

  • Cut the BS
  • Build tension
  • Stay focused on your message

Whatever you do, don’t be boring. โœ”๏ธ

I personally want to tell engaging stories to inspire people.

But the latest Invisibilia episode raises an interesting point: Yes, stories are powerful. But is that always a good thing? What if stories can be weaponized to manipulate you? (For example, I don’t know, maybe “The election was stolen.”)

To that end, Invisibilia decided to look at the opposite of a tight, message-driven story. They decided to focus on super slow, boring non-stories. For example an uninterrupted 9-hour train ride through Norway. It originally aired on Norwegian TV. They also did a ship’s 11-hour journey and more.

I have to say that the result is oddly satisfying. I mean, it’s not The Usual Suspects or even Citizen Kane, but it hits right if you want something relaxing. And it definitely will not manipulate you into thinking anything more than, “Gosh, Norway is pretty.” or perhaps just, “Ahh, trains…”

Hell, I have it on in the background right now just for the sound. They describe this kind of video as having “weak narrativity”. ๐Ÿ˜†

The video is so slow that you have to make sure it’s not paused after you start it. ๐Ÿค”

But it picks up (kind of). ๐Ÿšž

๐Ÿ‘‰ The podcast also suggests that this kind of non-narrative might promote democracy, individualism, and community. Not bad for some train footage.

And don’t forget slow radio.

Software Dev

Pulse: Network Inspector

If you want to debug your network traffic on iOS, Pulse looks like a great alternative to WiresharkProxyman, and Charles Proxy.

Pulse takes a different approach, embedding into your app rather than sniffing the network, which can be pretty invasive. (Proxyman “basically performs a MITM attack to see your encrypted traffic.” ๐Ÿค”)

๐Ÿ‘‰ Pulse: Network Inspector

What I wished iOS had is a simple analog of Safari Web Inspector. So I built just that.

Via iOS Dev Weekly.

Pulse Logo
Software Dev

Mobile Native Foundation: Developing Large-Scale Apps

Writing apps for a large organization has its own unique challenges.

Large teams require that you collaborate in complex ways while keeping quality and delivery speed high. It’s not straightforward, and it makes the days of knocking out an app on your own look fun and easy, if somewhat solitary.

@MobileNativeFoundation

It’s not just about “data structures and algorithms” or any of that Computer Science 101 stuff at this level.

The Mobile Native Foundation is a new organization that focuses on large-scale app development issues for iOS and Android.

It’s mostly just discussion groups right now, but they have contributions from people at large companies with apps you know and respect such as Lyft and Spotify.

The discussions cover relevant topics ranging from organizational (such as Encouraging and enforcing testing), to design (Building Modern UI), to technical (Splitting an app into modules).

๐Ÿ‘‰ This site also reminds me of a book on large-scale app development that I’m currently working through: Building Mobile Apps at Scale.

Via iOS Dev Weekly.