Books

Super Summary: Quiet, The Power of Introverts

A super-summary on this blog is basically a “summary of a summary” of a book, with a few additions of my own. It gives you the basic idea of a book to see if you want to read the real thing.

Next up via Lucid: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking [book | audiobook].

Who are the introverts?

Introverts are people who tend to benefit from alone time. They favor reflective and deliberate thinking. This approach lets them dig deep.

Some classic introverts are Albert Einstein, Rosa Parks, Abraham Lincoln, and Warren Buffett. Isaac Newton was known to be “a deeply introverted character and fiercely protective of his privacy.”

👉My favorite new introvert is standup comedian Taylor Tomlinson, who framed introversion with this joke:

I read a statistic that said in 80 percent of homicides cases the killer was someone the victim knew. When I read that, I was relieved. Like thank god, I don’t want to get murdered and meet someone. That’s a lot for a Friday, getting stabbed and acquainted.

Introverts have a hidden side

While introverts tend to be outwardly quiet, they can also be bold, strong, and courageous. This is not a paradox.

See examples above. ☝️ You don’t have to be loud to revolutionize our understanding of the world, save a nation, or build a fortune.

They may not be fun at parties, but these are some heavy hitters when it comes to lasting, positive change in the world.

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Via Lucid

Introverts aren’t always introverted

Introverts can act extroverted pretty convincingly if it is in the service of something they love. An introvert can do public speaking or standup comedy as long as it serves a core purpose.

This explains introverted, charismatic entertainers such as Prince

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Via Lucid

👉 As a bit of an introvert myself, I admire the fun, freewheeling nature of many extroverts. I’m trying to learn from them to do more and think less. But I also appreciate that my core happiness lies within and I can have some of my best nights all to myself.

The World

Immunity 🦠: It’s in Your Bones 🦴

There has been some confusion around the topic of how long Coronavirus immunity lasts, so it’s nice to see some new info about it. This is not the first time we’ve seen evidence that Coronavirus immunity is long-lasting, well beyond the life of your active antibodies.

Yes, antibodies fight an active infection. But your immunity does not end there. Memory of the virus lives in your bone marrow 🤯 as “memory B cells”. You can literally feel it in your bones. 😉

These B cells retain intel on the virus you had previously fought off so your body can produce fresh antibodies quickly on re-exposure. B cells last for years, if not your entire life. And they’re flexible and can deal with variants as well.

So if you’ve been vaccinated or had the virus and recovered, enjoy your amazing immune system and go forth and conquer!

Travel

The Cerne Abbas Giant

Next time in England, it would be fun to visit some of the ancient geoglyphs etched into chalk in the hills there.

The Cerne Abbas Giant, for one, is 180 feet tall and has a 26-foot-long, uh, thing. People visit it for fertility. 🤔

👉 The Mysterious Origins of the Cerne Abbas Giant (The New Yorker)

And there are plenty of others with odd stories. Always a good excuse to get out to some otherwise random English countryside.

You

How To Talk To People You Disagree With

Lots of people are still hesitant to get the Corona vaccine. Maybe you’re one of them. Or maybe they’re driving you crazy.

If you want to know how to talk to people about this — or really about any subject on which you disagree with someone — then there are some good tips in this example text message conversation.

Hint: It turns out that it’s not helpful to lecture people, judge them, or overload them with information. Who knew? 🤷🏻‍♂️😉