Software Dev

The Prototype Mindset

We developers spend so much time focusing on the details of our work that we sometimes forget about the big picture. The presentation below from try! Swift Tokyo has some really helpful perspective. 🤯

Think about building the right thing before building it right.

Why are you making software? Know your motivations. It affects how you do your job.

Who do you write code for? Think about how you relate to your company and the end user.

What happens when your tech stack changes? Be resilient in your career. Try new things while also shipping apps.

Be less precious about code.

Realistically, how long will this code last? How robust is robust enough? Be pragmatic. Almost all the code I’ve written in the last few years is gone by now, either retired or completely rewritten.

Don’t try to be perfect. Don’t hold back out out fear.

Real artists ship.

Steve Jobs

How often do you test? Unit tests are a means to an end. Passing unit tests alone does not mean it’s a good app.

Via iOS Dev Weekly.

Software Dev

Algorithms Interview Rant 🙌

It’s great to hear another dev just flat-out rant about the stupidity of “the algorithm interview”. Or as I call it, the “Computer Science 101” interview.

This podcast is basically saying that an effective interview should focus on things that you actually do on the job. In what crazy world are we interviewing for one skill and hiring for another?

I’ve been through a few “algorithm” interviews. They’re not that hard. They’re just annoying and misguided.

We are not in college any more. We are solving real-world problems.

The hardest technical interview I ever had as an iOS developer focused on things like the trade offs between different approaches to concurrency, effective testing at different levels, dependency management, and optimizing table views. These are much more interesting problems than a binary search.

If you do a computer science 101 interview, I guess you get to hire a bunch of computer science students. 🤷🏻‍♂️

You

Why It’s Better to Find Success Later in Life

👉 Why It’s Better to Find Success Later in Life

Nothing super groundbreaking in this article, but it’s a good refresher. Basically, you earn a certain amount of success, happiness, and confidence by failing and bouncing back over time.

This is a lot of how I look at parenting (hopefully) resilient kids…

…the best way to gain strength is by falling and continually bouncing back, practicing, working around obstacles. But this flexibility is critical to long-term success.

Fortunately, it’s easy to struggle. 😉 This makes me think of George Washington, who failed a lot. Like, he was pretty bad for quite a while before he became amazing.

You don’t need to go out of your way to struggle and stumble, because it will happen naturally to most of us. And many a great has failed before they bloomed.

Software Dev · The World · You

The fastest-growing well-paid job: app developer

Takeaway: App developers are not the fastest growing job. But they are the fastest growing well-paid job.

There is one six-figure salary job that is seeing more openings than any other over the next few years: app developer. The U.S. will add over 255,000 app developer positions to the job market between 2016 and 2026, more than any other high-paying job

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/news/the-fastest-growing-well-paid-job-3911825/


You

Should You Take That Promotion? Well, Maybe.

Summary

Consider…

  • Do you know what the new role is clearly defined, you know what the expectations are and why the position is open?
  • Do you have (or want to develop) the skills to do the job?
  • Do you want to do that kind of work?

What does success in this role look like?

Health and lifestyle

The new gig might negatively impact your health if it’s not a good fit. Chronic work-related stress can cause high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels.

Goals

If you don’t have specific objectives in mind — identifiable skills you want to sharpen, an idea of the direction you want your career to go — you’re not going to know if this promotion is going to get you to closer to those goals

Use self-assessment tools such as Strengthsfinder to figure out if the promotion plays to your talents.

“Think of what you’re doing now, what you’re good at, what you want to do more of, and see if the promotion will allow you to continue to do that,” she said. “If the promotion is not going to let you do that, it might not be a good fit.”

Priorities

Try ranking the top three things you’re looking for in any position you take. Everyone’s priorities are different. For some, it could be proximity to home, the ability to engage in challenging work and maintaining a certain salary bracket. For others, flexible work hours, being on a cohesive team and access to mentors are priorities

New opportunities

It’s important to keep an open mind and think about the doors that might open if you take the job. You could contribute to an exciting project, break into an emerging industry or learn a new skill set

Take control

focus on the things you can control when it comes to your professional development. Instead of fretting over when opportunities for advancement will present themselves, hone your expertise and strengthen your network so you’ll be a competitive hire no matter what