History

The Tulsa Massacre of 1921

Quartz published the story of the Tulsa massacre of 1921, in which the burgeoning “Black Wall Street” neighborhood of Tulsa was set ablaze in a bizarre night of white racial rage. Hundreds or African Americans were killed, and many thousands lost their homes.

πŸ‘‰ We still don’t know just how much was lost in the Tulsa massacre of 1921

More than a thousand African American homes and businesses were looted and burned to the ground; you had a thriving community occupying more than 35 square blocks in Tulsa that was totally destroyed.

But the real story is how little we know about this, “the single largest incident of racial violence in American history.” This terrible story was purposefully forgotten, apparently out of shame.

Despite the gravity of the event, like other important chapters of African-American history, the Tulsa race massacre was all but deleted from the US’s collective memory for decades.

It is also interesting that this savage attack did not destroy the neighborhood, which came bouncing back stronger than ever after the violence. However, eventually the larger forces of “desegregation, urban redesign, and competition from large-scale white businesses” did it in. πŸ€¦πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ

Via Apple News.

History · The World

How the Coronavirus Compares With 100 Years of Deadly Events

This coronavirus pandemic has killed over 100,000 Americans alone. It has changed the way we live.

That’s pretty awful. But compared to other historical events, how bad is it?

This article shows how this pandemic compares to other major disasters of the last 100 years. It’s worse than the 1918 Spanish flu was in New York City and Boston, but still not as bad as the Spanish flu in Philadelphia. And not as bad the 2011 Earthquake and tsunami in Miyagi, Japan.

This article only covers the 20th century. I wish they could have included the Bubonic plague or other plagues to see how our current experience compares. πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ

It’s a great visual to help understand a terrible event.

The World

It’s Time To Go On the Offensive Against the Coronavirus

I was talking with my kids about going after the virus the other day, half jokingly but also half serious…

I’m tired of sitting around the house waiting for the pandemic to solve itself. We didn’t win World War II sitting around the house hoping the Axis would surrender! We didn’t land on the moon waiting around doing nothing to see if somehow someone magically landed there!

It’s the same with the virus. We need to go after the virus! We need to hunt it down and destroy it until the planet earth is free if this deadly, hidden nemesis of all humankind.

It’s time for action!

As Winston Churchill would say, or rather did say, near the beginning of World War II…

We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender.

Winston Churchill – June 4, 1940

I joked with my kids that we should have a day where everyone in the world just Clorox’s every inch of the planet. “Inch by inch!” was our rally cry.

So I was pleased to see this article come up on The New Yorker, which offers more realistic and helpful ideas than a Clorox Day. Still, it basically says that that yes, we can and should go on the offensive against the coronavirus. It offers hope and something specific to actually do! πŸ’ͺ🏻🌎

πŸ‘‰ It’s Not Too Late to Go on Offense Against the Coronavirus

Thank you, Jim Yong Kim, inspiring physician and anthropologist. Via Apple News.

Austin · Travel

Distinctive Destinations

Here’s a great site for finding interesting historical sites in your area or when you travel.

πŸ‘‰ Distinctive Destinations

This is from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, so it’s authentic and not some kind of sales pitch or ad-driven site.

Here around Austin, they list the Elisabet Ney Museum and O. Henry Museum.

You can also get a nation-wide map of more places to explore. Maps + history + real-world sites? For me, that’s heaven. πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ

Travel

National Building Museum

Okay, this Austin Graff character really has me going on Washington DC now. I’ve always had the National Building Museum in the back of my mind when visiting DC, but now I have to go see it.

The thing is, I always had a slight cognitive dissonance about this museum. Is it a museum about buildings? Or a museum about building things? Or just a museum in a building? Whatever the case, I’m there!

Travel

DAR Library

This looks like a great place to visit for some quiet time and to soak tip some pre-industrial America while in DC. Or maybe enjoy some genealogical and historical manuscripts, if that’s your thang. Or just looked around with mouth wide open. 😲🀩

(DAR = Daughters of the American Revolution)